On This Day

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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Wed Jul 05, 2017 12:04 pm

On this day in 1900 the Varsity match began between Oxford and Cambridge University.

Oxford opened the batting and were soon 22-2. If you told them then they would raise the highest total to date in a Varsity match as well as (future England player) Tip Foster scoring the highest individual score by a batsman in this fixture they would not have believed you. Foster was out on 171. He was joined by Charles Pilkington (87) and Henry Martyn (94) in superlative displays with the bat that saved the innings. Pilkington and Foster put together a huge 168 for their partnership which took the innings away from Cambridge. When Foster was out the score read 281-4.

The press coverage of the match was hampered by a decision made by the Lord's ground which led to scathing critiques printed in the national press. The cricket reporters were exiled from the grandstand and moved into the North East corner of the ground - a position where visibility was minimal. Any requests to be reseated were met with a curt refusal.

At its peak the match was watched by 10,000 people.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Thu Jul 06, 2017 9:26 am

On this day in 1900 Cambridge push on as Varsity match ends in a draw.

Oxford's innings was over by lunchtime in the second day with the team all out for 503. Within the first hour Cambridge were batting. Their opener, Leonard Moon, began proceedings well with a score of 58 but it was the batting of Tom Taylor and Rockley Wilson who really helped Cambridge to push on. These two batsmen helped navigate Cambridge away from any danger of being asked to follow on. In the tail a half century from Samuel Day and Edward Dowson pushed Cambridge to a more than laudable score. The Oxford bowlers made hay in the middle order but would have been disappointed with their yield. Cambridge ended on 358-8.

The reports of the day were much briefer than the first in further protest of Lord's decision to move the press box.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Fri Jul 07, 2017 6:12 pm

On this day in 1900 the cricket writers are the real winners as the Varsity game peters out into a draw.

Cambridge University's tail added a precious fifty extra runs to their overnight total to end up on 392 - still 111 behind Oxford.

Oxford University played sportingly but sensibly. They batted quickly with every intention to declare - however also wanted to ensure that losing the game was never an option. Again it was Charles Pilkington and Tip Foster who did the most damage as they both got to within a spitting distance of their half centuries before being dismissed. Oxford declared on 219 for 6 - setting Cambridge 330 to win with not a lot of time on their hands.

Cambridge went on to play for the draw and their batsmen did little to risk their wickets. Openers Leonard Moon and John Stanning were both dismissed for 60 and were the only batsmen to fall as hands were shaken with Cambridge on 186-2.

The fact that there was no write up of the game in the newspapers the next day as cricket journalists protested against their new press box may have forced the MCC's hands. After spending two days refusing the journalists pleas for relocation they announced after the game that the MCC would consider how they could relocate the press back into the main grand stand as soon as possible. The next time a game was played at Lord's - a mere 10 days later - the press were back in the grand stand and the following year a new press box was built.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Sat Jul 08, 2017 10:34 am

On this day in 1910 Harrow get off to a good start against Eton.

In a time when this fixture is a nonentity, it is hard to imagine that in the early 1900s this end of term fixture was the highlight of the cricketing calendar. The first day's play drew 10,000 people to Lord's to watch as Harrow put on a good total.

The partnership of 69 between Wilson and Geoffrey Hopley managed to make up for the early loss of Tom Jameson. When Hopley went on 35 he was soon followed by Turnbull. The first three wickets had all been taken by Bob Fowler.

The middle order kept up the momentum with Guy Earle and Walter Monckton both out for twenty and Hillyard besting them both with a top score of 62. From there the tail faded away and Harrow had put on a relatively huge total of 232. Fowler and Allan Steel both got 4 wickets.

Harrow managed to carry their dominance into their bowling when they dismissed five batsmen for single figures before stumps were drawn. Fowler was looking comparatively strong though with an overnight score of nine. At stumps Eton were 40-5 and facing a deficit of 192.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Sun Jul 09, 2017 10:12 am

On this day in 1910 Bob Fowler's Eton pull off one of the biggest comebacks in cricket.

Harrow's dominance continued into the morning session of the second day. Harrow only added 27 runs to their overnight total with the rest of the batting line up contributing Single figure scores. It was only Fowler who managed to get to the relatively heady heights of 21 runs. With a deficit of 16, Harrow asked Eton to follow on. And things didn't get much better.

Within no time at all Harrow had humbled Eton to 65-5 in the follow on innings. This brought Fowler to the crease who batted slowly and tried to accumulate runs. In his partnership with Denis Wigan he scored 26 of the 42 runs, in his partnership with William Boswell he scored 24 of the 57 runs. Fowler eventually was out for 64 off the bowling of Hillyard but his batting had inspired the team. The last wicket partnership, led by Manners, put on 50 together. The fact that Eton had overhauled the total at all was laudable but Harrow now needed a mere 55 to win.

Just as quickly as Eton were run through, Fowler inflicted damage to Harrow. He had claimed all six batsmen for the gain of only 21 runs before Harrow knew where they were at. Allan Steel broke the chain but Fowler then came back and claimed two more - all of this in the time that it took Harrow to put on 11 runs. The final wicket needed 23 to win. Ogilvie Graham and Alexander led some tension to the proceedings but Steel broke them up after they had put on 13. Eton had won the match and Fowler had top-scored and bagged figures of 12-113.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Mon Jul 10, 2017 10:16 am

On this day in 2015 Mason Crane impresses on debut to help Hampshire beat Surrey.

Adam Wheater was the star man for Hampshire with the bat as he got his highest ever T20 score (78) to help his team to the total of 186. Michael Carberry began intelligently and zoned in on some speculative bowling before he was caught by Jason Roy off the bowling of James Burke for 18.

Opener James Vince then joined up with Wheater to bag a partnership of 50 before Zafar Ansari accounted for the captain. Shortly after Wheater got to his half century from 29 balls. Azhar Mahmood was the best bowler for Surrey with a yield of 2-19.

Jason Roy started the chase strongly but soon enough both he and Tom Curran were both out. Veterans Kumar Sangakara and Vikram then put on 60 for the third wicket to put Surrey's chase back on track.

In three overs they were derailed again. Crane got his first wicket - that of Sangakara for 28. Will Smith then ousted his replacement Rory Burns for two and Crane returned to send Solanki back. Surrey were now 88-5.

Ansari followed soon after and a brave resistance from Mahmood and Ben Foakes worth 22 was in vain. Mahmood was the last man out and would have been pleased with his score of 34 but not with his team's loss by 29 runs.

Crane, only included in the team due to injury, produced figures of 2-35.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Tue Jul 11, 2017 8:05 am

On this day in 1842 the much anticipated match between Kent and All England began.

This match, which had been the principal topic of conversation for some time, began with much pomp. It is believed that, at the time, it was the most gambled upon sporting event in history and pigeons were sent out after each innings to inform far and wide of the score.

4000 people huddled in to Lord's to watch the event with 100 further noble lords and ladies present.

Kent won the toss and went in first wherein they made 120 runs. No scorecard is available but the two Mynn brothers, Alfred and Walter, were given special praise. Walter showed great things with the bat whilst Alfred showed his all round ability when All England came in.

All England were beset by Alfred and struggled at times however decent totals for Charles Hawkins and Tom Box allowed them to bat to stumps. They were just holding on at the drawing of stumps with their score on 125.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Wed Jul 12, 2017 9:44 am

On this day in 1842 Kent stun All England with victory.

All England's first innings was wrapped up very early on the second day with them adding just 7 runs to their overnight score to end on 133 - a slender lead of 13.

Kent's second innings was even more impressive than their first and the Domestic team posted a comparatively huge 151. Again, lamentably, there is no full scorecard for this match but the second innings for Kent saw the Mynn brothers excel again - Walter got 28 and Alfred, batting seventh got 33. A solid 13 at the death for Charles Whittaker boosted the score. Despite the large score conceded, seven wickets were picked up by William Lillywhite.

All England were set a target of 164 and in a mad hurry to dash them off were bowled out for 88. The only players to emerge with any credit were Thomas Sewell (35) and Charles Taylor (19) but apart from that no other player got out of single figures. The achievements of Taylor were more impressive when taken in to consideration that he was not going to bat due to hurting his hand in the first innings - due to the dire straits of his team he batted with one hand for his 19. All rounder Arthur Mynn got six wickets to add to his haul.

It is believed that Kent's victory over a group of players believed to be the finest Cricketers in the world shook up the gambling world as well as the cricketing one.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Thu Jul 13, 2017 7:08 am

On this day in 2004 the sixth annual Lord’s Taveners National Table Cricket Final was won by Victoria School.

The title pitted reigning champions Victoria School against Birmingham’s Wilson Stuart School.

The game was invented for young people with physical impairments and Lord’s opened it up to the home of cricket in 1998. The competition pits 44 schools signed up to the scheme against one another.

Wilson Stuart School still a force in Table Cricket – they are the 2017 champions.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Fri Jul 14, 2017 7:39 am

On this day in 1914, despite the forthcoming outbreak of war, Tunbridge Wells Week continues as it always has done.

Despite the tremors that were engulfing Europe, idyllic county cricket still continued in Tunbridge Wells.

In times when one's nation is in peril one tends to look for the positives in life and the write ups of this festival certainly does that. The weather is "ideal", the town "Gay" and the ground "beautiful."

The new Pavilion, rebuilt since the terrorist attack of the previous year (see viewtopic.php?f=30&t=20694&p=704954&hilit=Suffragette#p704954) gets its debut during the festival. It is an ornate and picturesque building of red brick and tiles with white woodwork.

The attendance was very large throughout the week. The boldness of the clothing and the company also acted in stark contrast to the austerity that lay ahead. The ladies' frocks and sunshades were of many different colours and music was playing from the bandstand almost constantly - even throughout the cricket.

During the evening plays, operas and dances are acted out.

The very next day the Russian ambassador to Austria-Hungary wrote to St. Petersburg saying War looked an inevitability. Cricket would not return to Tunbridge Wells for five years.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Sat Jul 15, 2017 10:24 am

On this day in 1850 the North upset the form book to beat the South in one day.

The day formed itself into thirds - each dominated by bowling.

The South's batting lineup was completely decimated by the slow bowling of William Clarke who removed three of the batsmen with John Wisden getting a further two. The South were completely overwhelmed. The high score was Billy Caffyn's 9 whilst four players were out for a duck. The Southerners were all out for 36.

The first half of North's innings seemed like single figures were par for the pitch. With the exception of a stand of 15 between George Parr and Robert King, the first seven batsmen seemed underwhelming. It was the tail that put on the runs to draw North to a decent lead. It was the eight wicket partnership of Wisden (22) and Lord Gurney (27) that allowed the North to feel comfortable. Even the last man out, Clarke, got a handy 13. The North's total was 131.

The South got to bat again in the evening session facing a deficit of 98. Whilst they did better than their first innings, they could not produce the goods. Caffyn again top scored with 24 and tried to put a decent total on with a number of partners who fell cheaply. When he was joined by James Chester he himself fell to stem any Southern momentum. Chester and Mynn put on identical scores of 17, with Mynn carrying his bat, but the rest of the scores were, yet again, in the single figures. Remarkably Wisden got all ten wickets clean bowled taking his tally for the day to 13 alongside his 22 with the bat. South had been dismissed for 76.

The North had won by an innings and 19 runs.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Sun Jul 16, 2017 9:47 am

On this day in 1888 those passing the Paddington Recreation Ground would have seen a most unusual game of cricket being carried out.

Ladies and gentlemen of the theatrical profession had assembled on their day off to play out a game of cricket against one another.

This was not the first such game of the summer. In the original game, in which the gentlemen could only bat with broomsticks, the gentlemen had beaten the ladies comfortably. This forced another rule wherein, whilst batting and fielding, the gentlemen had their strongest hand tied behind their back.

This added (and very literal) handicap proved more decisive for the men in the second game. The ladies, batting first, put on 60 and, in reply, the men could only muster 23 - handing the ladies a 23 run victory.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Mon Jul 17, 2017 7:19 am

On this day in 2015 Lancashire upset the form book by beating T20 Blast leaders Warwickshire.

It was Steven Croft who received the plaudits for Lancashire as his late order 64 pushed up the scoring rate before he also bagged two wickets.

Lancashire started poorly with the early loss of openers Ashwell Prince and Liam Livingstone which left them at 20-2. This didn't improve when the Warwickshire bowlers kept scoring hard and regularly removed batsmen. With 44-4 on the board at the half way point things looked dire for Lancashire. The 59 run stand between Croft and James Faulkner did just that as Lancashire ended on 145.

Warwickshire began the chase equally as stolidly before Brendon McCullum set about trying to up the run rate. The second wicket partnership between McCullum and Tom Lewis gave Warwickshire hope but when Croft dismissed them both, momentum was lost and wickets fell regularly. Croft managed to also contribute in the field with Laurie Evans and Jeetan Patel both being snared by the inform Lancastrian. Warwickshire could only get 137 from their allocated overs.

Warwickshire may have been slack due to the fact they were already guaranteed a semifinal berth.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Tue Jul 18, 2017 7:23 am

On this day in 1898 Billy Gunn punctures Grace's birthday in Day One of the Gentlemen v Players fixture.

The opening day of this match was purposefully placed on W.G. Grace's fiftieth birthday by the MCC, furthermore no other first class games were played out in the country as a mark of respect. This year's outing was, remarkably, his 34th consecutive year playing in this fixture - having made his debut at 16.

20,000 people turned out on a lovely Summer's day to watch the opening day's cricket however they would have been disappointed if they were expecting to see W.G. bat as the Players first innings neatly encapsulated the day.

The Players struggled manfully against some of the finest bowlers in the land. The Gentlemen had the likes of Charles Kortright, Charlie Townsend and Sammy Woods in their bowling attack to stem the ambitions of the Players. The only Player who remained truly ambivalent to such depth of bowling attack was Gunn. He began tentatively, especially against Kortright and Townsend but worked his way into form and began to punish the Gentlemen.

Gunn was abetted by Bill Storer in a stand of 113 before the latter was the only wicket for Jack Mason on 59. William Brockwell was with Gunn when he departed on 139, caught Townsend bowled Kortright, and then tried to continue the momentum ending up with 47, however the tail didn't have much to offer. The Players were all out for 335 with Townsend being the happiest of the bowlers with 4-58.

Gunn's 139 was the highest score by any player in this fixture.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Wed Jul 19, 2017 9:03 am

On this day in 1898 the Gentlemen fall to a first innings deficit against the Players.

Chasing a total of 335, W.G. Grace, a day after his birthday, put on two strong opening stands. He put on 56 with Andrew Stoddart, in which he was by far the most aggressive, and a further 23 with Stanley Jackson. He was out for 43, the second wicket of Bill Lockwood.

The biggest partnership of the day was the 52 between Jackson and Archie MacLaren however when these two were split up, John Hearne ran through the tail. Jack Mason and John Dixon both posted scores in the thirties but the lower order showed no resilience and the Gentlemen were gone for 303 - a deficit of 22. Hearne ended with figures of 5-87.

The Players came in again in the evening session and lost both openers cheaply. Arthur Shrewsbury and Bobby Abel were both gone with just 21 on the board. Bill Storer (21) and John Tunnicliffe (5) saw the Players through to close where they ended on 42-2 - a lead of 66.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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