On This Day

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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Thu Jul 20, 2017 8:58 am

On this day in 1898 the Gentlemen crumble to hand victory to the Players.

The overnight partnership of Bill Storer and John Tunnicliffe batted together through most of the morning session to add 85 to the Players' lead. When Tunnicliffe was sent back on 44 by Jack Mason, Billy Gunn continued the fast paced run scoring. When Storer was also sent back in for 73, clean bowled by Charlie Townsend, Gunn took on the responsibility himself. He was joined by a myriad of partners but none showed any intentions of sticking around as Mason ran through the tail. The highest score from any batsmen batting from four down was last man in, John Hearne. The Players were all out for 263 - a lead of 295.

The equation was simple - the Players needed to bowl the Gentlemen out, the Gentlemen needed to survive the day.

The Gentlemen began poorly and it degenerated from there. Wickets were lost with some regularity - both openers were gone for a joint total of 14 runs. It was only the batting of Stanley Jackson who managed to make the score look respectable. Then the middle order was gutted with scores of 9 for Sammy Woods and ducks for both Teddy Wynyard and Mason. Shortly after that Hearne claimed Jackson and it looked like the race was run.

Right at the bitter end it looked like an unlikely pair might have given the Gentlemen hope. W.G. Grace, batting very far down the order, and Charles Kortright, last man in, put on a phenomenal stand of 78 runs. As the clock ticked towards half past six and the stand continued, the crowd celebrated thinking that was the time to draw stumps - the umpires had to point out play was due to finish at 7. Time ticked on. With 5 minutes left to go Bill Lockwood dispatched Kortright for 46 and stranded Grace on 31. A heartbreaking dismissal handed the Players a 137 run victory.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Fri Jul 21, 2017 10:20 am

On this day in 1864 W.G. Grace makes his debut at Lord's playing for South Wales against the Marylebone Club and Ground.

The attendance for this fixture was very poor on the opening morning as South Wales won the toss and chose to bat. The brothers of E.M. and W.G Grace both featured but it was the younger brother who produced the best display with the bat. Edward was not fortunate enough to score but, 3 days after his 16th birthday, W.G Grace made a fine innings of 50. This total was only eclipsed by the 65 scored by Captain R. Jones. South Wales put on 211 in their first innings.

Marylebone had a chance to bat as the day drew to a close and put on 47 in reply for the loss of one wicket.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Sat Jul 22, 2017 8:47 am

On this day in 1864 Marylebone Club and Ground draw with South Wales as W.G. Grace fails in second innings of Lord's debut.

Wickets fell regularly for South Wales as their overnight total of 47-1 swelled to 186 before they were all out. The main contributors to this total were Thomas Hearne and Infelix who got 59 and 47 respectively. The rest of the batting line up was a disappointment and would have given South Wales some hope. They had a 25 run lead.

This hope was punctured when the South Wales batting line up wilted like a week old leek. Within the blink of an eye they were all out for 79. The dynamic duo from the first innings, Captain R. Jones and W.G. Grace, disappointed in the second innings; Grace was out for just two and Jones did not even register.

Despite the fact that South Wales held a mere 104 run lead, it was time that hampered the MCC cause as they could reach only 28 of those runs before stumps were drawn.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Sun Jul 23, 2017 10:49 am

On this day in 1827 the largest crowd ever drawn to an English cricket game assembled to watch Sussex play All England.

It is estimated that about four and a half thousand people came together in the first day of a game which had created unprecedented buzz in the world of cricket. This match was the third of three matches between the two teams with the purpose of ascertaining whether roundarm bowling should be made legal. The series was 2-0 in Sussex's favour rendering the game a dead rubber.

All England batted first and were let down by their best players, only mustering 27 runs. Edward Budd, believed to be one of the foremost Cricketers in the country, was out for a paltry 8 and George Osbaldeston, another All English star, was out for a duck. Five of the All English wickets were taken off the roundarm bowling of William Lillywhite and Jem Broadbridge.

Sussex then went in and got 77 runs in reply. George Brown topscored for Sussex with 24 runs. In the battle between roundarm and underarm bowling, All England fell very much on the side of underarm and only had one bowler who practiced the more radical bowling motion. Budd got two wickets with his underarm motion.

Despite the fact that Sussex's innings terminated after six o'clock, All England came back in for a final 40 minutes. At stumps the score was 10-1, giving Sussex a 40 run lead.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Mon Jul 24, 2017 10:18 am

On this day in 1827 Edward Budd and James Saunders save All England against Sussex.

Sussex began the day by removing William Ward (3), George Osbaldeston (7) and Tom Marsden cheaply. This then brought together Budd and Saunders who managed to steady the ship, however many would have expected that the game would have been done before the end of the day. Run rates in this era are hard to quantify but at half past two the pair were on 14 and 18 respectively with their team on 65-5; by the end of their innings - at about half six - All England were 169-5. Saunders made a combative 44 to topscore for All England.

Sussex, once looking so comfortable, were now facing a chase of 119. They began in the most poor of fashions. In the hand full of overs before stumps were drawn they had lost three wickets for the gain of just 11 runs. In one afternoon's play fortunes had reversed for the two teams.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Tue Jul 25, 2017 10:40 am

On this day in 1827 All England complete turnaround to beat Sussex.

Sussex's poor spell with the bat continued into the third day as they slipped from their overnight score of 11-3 to 53-7.

With 67 still to get, Sussex provided a morsel of nerves as Edward Thwaites and James Dale managed to string together a partnership, however they could not overthrow the total as the game terminated with a deficit of 24 runs.

Despite the point of the series, the MCC could not ascertain the legality of roundarm bowling. The proponents of roundarm bowling, William Broadbridge and Jem Lillywhite, continued to practice the controversial motion but it was not until as late as 1835 that roundarm bowling became fully legalised.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Wed Jul 26, 2017 11:12 am

On this day in 1858 Two embryonic England sides met for the benefit of George Parr.

In the days before a formalised English side many different unofficial sides cropped up alongside each other and George Parr brought together the All England Eleven and the United All England Eleven for his testimonial match.

All England won the toss and elected to bat. Alfred Diver and Edwin Stephenson opened and put together a decent opening partnership before Diver was dismissed for 13 with All England on 20-1. Edwin was then joined by his brother Heathfield. The two brothers scored quickly and by the time Heathfield was dismissed for 16 the score read 64-2.

Parr himself then walked out to bat and the run rate continued apace. Edwin was the next batsman out for a lusty 33. Parr was then joined by a number of All English batsmen. The marvellously named Julius Caesar came, saw and conquered with a quickfire 24, Cris Tinley then got a mere single and William Wadsworth got 7. The score was 133-6.

The next batsman out was the main man Parr, who was caught and bowled by James Grundy for 28. The tail went on to wag well for the All English. Edgar Willsher and Alfred Clarke put on good runs together before the latter was caught by John Wisden for 21. All England were 173-8.

John Jackson then joined Willsher and the pair looked to be getting settled before the latter was gone for 33, caught and bowled by William Martingell. The last wicket showed the stoicism of the innings as Jackson and Robert Gibson persevered, the latter helping the former to a top score of 45 before he was caught out by Wisden. The All English total was 254.

United All England managed to face some deliveries before stumps and Bob Carpenter (11) and Thomas Hearne (3) made the score 17 without loss in reply.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Thu Jul 27, 2017 10:43 am

On this day in 1858 John Jackson turns out to be the hero of George Parr's testimonial as he runs through United All England to hand All England victory.

Having started their innings relatively comfortably, United All England succumbed in short order in their first innings. Going from 17-0, Jackson claimed 6 wickets for 40 runs to ensure the United All English total only reached 87.

With the United side still 167 in arrears they were asked to follow on and did no better in their second innings. Whilst they degenerated to 70 all out, Jackson improved, matching his tally of six wickets from the first innings but improving his economy by only leaking 28 runs.

The United side were humbled by an innings and 97 run defeat.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Fri Jul 28, 2017 10:20 am

On this day in 1971 Lancashire played Gloucestershire in the semi-final of the Gillette Cup...and in the dark.

Gloucestershire batted first and thanks to half centuries from Ronald Nicholls and Mike Procter managed to get their total to 229.

The innings break was interrupted by an hour's worth of rain but Lancashire were able to start their innings belatedly. At 7.30pm an awful lot of cricket was still to be played but the umpires decided to see the game through to its climax. In what was a great display of unsportsmanlike behaviour, the Gloucestershire bowlers then set about bowling slower overs to disadvantage their opponents. This plan seemed to be coming to fruition when big hitters such as Barry Wood and Clive Lloyd were dismissed fairly cheaply. With 14 overs left Lancashire needed 67 runs.

The two Jacks, Bond and Simmons, tried their best in failing light. Simmons was the more effective Jack as he got 25 runs in a partnership of 40 before he was bowled by John Mortimore. Lancashire were 203-7 and needed 27 off five overs.

David Hughes, the next batsman in, had acclimatised himself to the poor light conditions by shutting himself in the changing room with the lights off. This preparation seemed to pay dividends when he released hell with four overs left. With 25 needed, Hughes scorched 24 off the bowling of Mortimore with only two of his strikes not going to the boundary. Gallingly it was Bond that took the winning runs with the clock ticking past nine.

Lancashire went on to beat Kent in an altogether better lit final.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Sat Jul 29, 2017 9:59 am

On this day in 1944 a wartime cricket game comes under fire.

The game between the Army and the RAF began normally enough. The Army won the toss and elected to bat and had got to 57-1 when the sounds of reality hit them. The sound of a German flying-bomb whirred overhead. If the whirring stopped they knew that it would be heading right for Lord's and their game.

With all the precision of a run out, the bomb started to drop above the cricket ground. As the bomb came into sight it seemed like it would land in the grounds outside the stadium. Instead it landed just next door in Albert Road...but didn't go off.

Showing the wartime attitude, the game continued with an unexplored bomb just to the south. Strangely enough after the bomb scare, the Army batted better. Captain David Townsend and Lieutenant Maurice Leyland put on 40 together before the wheels started to come off. The Army left the declaration late, doing so at 211-8. Flight Officer Bob Wyatt had the best of it for the RAF bowlers with figures of 5-81.

The RAF then had an hour and 45 minutes to overturn the deficit. Flight Lieutenant Charlie Barnett went out big from the off and was soon joined by an equally dynamic Flight Officer Reg Simpson and Sergeant Dennis Brookes who got 25 and 22 respectively. The middle order let the side down with the pace of their scoring and, with the exception of Squadron Leader Les Ames, were out quickly. It was only Ames' stoic batting that managed to force the draw on a day when much more could have been lost.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Sun Jul 30, 2017 10:45 am

On this day in 1840 a characteristically Irish game of cricket breaks out.

In Ballinasloe a game between Teetotallers and Whiskey Drinkers broke out...on a Wednesday no less.

This game mustered great support and the Teetotallers were able to boast the likes of Admiral William Thomas Le Poer Trench, 3rd Earl of Clancarty, 2nd Marquess of Heusden and his son Richard Somerset Le Poer Trench, 4th Earl of Clancarty, 3rd Marquess of Heusden...try fitting that on the scoreboard.

The scorecard of the game is unrecorded by the result lay in favour of the Whiskey Drinkers who won by 35 runs. Characteristically their celebrations were raucous and went on late into the night.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Mon Jul 31, 2017 10:38 am

On this day in 1931 two families face off against each other to continue a grand old tradition.

Throughout the Victorian era the family match was a very fashionable fixture and would see many spectators turning out. Although they began to fall out of favour there was the odd fixture in the 1900s with this match between the Smithers and the Streatfeilds being one of the later such instances.

One branch of the Smithers family would have gone home with furrowed brow as both son, opening, and father, batting at 4, were out for ducks, however this was sandwiched between a partnership worth 82 between R.L. And H. Smithers. It was often the case in games such as this that there would be some players that would be making up the numbers and it was the quality of those less technically advanced players that won or lost the match for you. After the big partnership was broken there was a string of underwhelming scores for the Smithers but D.W.'s unopposed 62 held the tail together and took them to a total of 199 all out. The Streatfeilds shared the wickets between them evenly with H.G.C, George and Granville, the latter two both professionals, sharing three wickets apiece.

The Streatfeild innings was defined by one large partnership. Both openers were dismissed with a mere 4 runs on the board but Granville and A.H.O put on a huge 145 runs between them. When this partnership was ended the tail showed no spine and could only put together a further 43 runs between them leaving them a mere 7 runs adrift of the total. Granville's 88 and A.H.O's 57 were the only scores higher than 6 by any of the Streatfeilds. R.L. And W. Smithers collected nine of the ten wickets.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Tue Aug 01, 2017 10:33 am

On this day in 1926 Bob Crockett is announced as umpire for the Ashes series.

Even in today's media saturated age, the announcement of an umpire would not make front page news but the announcement of Crockett, one of the foremost umpires of the day, officiating made the front page of The Times.

Whilst he was supposed to be present for the first game of the series he was delayed when the boat he was on caught fire and ended up officiating a game between the Australians and a schoolboy XI.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Wed Aug 02, 2017 10:41 am

On this day in 1979 England, Nottinghamshire and Victoria's Darren Pattinson was born.

Born in England, Pattinson moved to Australia as a child and began playing for Dandenonh Cricket Club - a part of the Victorian Premier League. From here he found himself drafted into the Victoria team, making his debut in 2007.

In 2008 he began spending the Northern hemisphere summers playing for Nottinghamshire and the Southern Hemisphere summers in Victoria.

When Pattinson was called up for the ICC Champions Trophy team it was a shock to many and more shocks were in store when he was called up for the Test team to replace an injured Ryan Sidebottom.

England selectors faced backlash from many cricket luminaries for the call up, despite the fact that the bowler picked up 29 wickets at an average of just over 20 runs for Nottinghamshire.

In his one and only Test appearance he scored 24 runs and got two wickets.

Pattinson, perhaps knocked by the criticism he received, never really returned to any type of form after that point however he did get his career best score of 8/35 against Western Australia in the 2010-11 season.

In 2013 Pattinson retired and became a greyhound trainer.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby Arthur Crabtree » Wed Aug 02, 2017 11:55 pm

Hope he's doing ok. He was treated pretty badly by the UK media.
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