On This Day

Read the more in depth thoughts of our posters on various cricketing issues, topics and events - and please take the opportunity to leave feedback and enter into debate.

Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Thu Aug 03, 2017 9:02 am

On this day in 1802 a game of cricket was held by royal appointment.

Held at the Devil's Dyke in Brighton, the game, the second of two, pitched East and West Sussex against each other as the crowning glory of a period of revelling held by George, the Prince of Wales.

The morning was given over to manoeuvres by the Prince's Regiment, which Prince George led in but many of his entourage were still in bed for due to a late night. By the time the bulk of the party had shaken off the excesses of the night before, the game was able to begin.

Both teams had very honourable men as their captains. The West Sussexers were led by Charles Lennox, 4th Duke of Richmond whilst East Sussex were fronted by Colonel Porter. The prize put up for the victory was 500 guineas.

As you would imagine, the scorecard is not extant but East Sussex won the game by a total of 61 runs.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
User avatar
The Professor
 
Posts: 2370
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 9:11 pm
Team(s) Supported: England
Kent

Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Fri Aug 04, 2017 8:53 am

On this day in 1974 streaking hit British sport for the first time.

On the fourth day of the Second Test of the Ashes series, Michael Angelow unclothed and ran across the field, leapt over the stumps before celebrating in front of the members.

On TMS, John Arlott immortalised the moment thusly: "We have got a freaker [sic] down the wicket now. Not very shapely, and it is masculine… he is being embraced by a blonde policeman and this may well be his last public appearance - but what a splendid one!"

Angelow was bet twenty pounds by a group of Australian fans to commit the act and when brought to trial he was fined....twenty pounds. He was advised by the judge to keep a low profile and his duly done so as he has never been since.

It was not the first instance of streaking in cricket however. The year before an Australia and New Zealand game was hit by streaking. The man eluded police and was not identified.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
User avatar
The Professor
 
Posts: 2370
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 9:11 pm
Team(s) Supported: England
Kent

Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Sat Aug 05, 2017 10:02 am

On this day in 1922 the Canterbury Week kicks off with a match benefiting Frank Woolley

By this time Woolley had scored 20,000 runs and had taken a shade under 1500 wickets since his debut for Kent in 1906. By this point he was certainly the best all round Cricketer in England, with many saying the best in the world.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
User avatar
The Professor
 
Posts: 2370
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 9:11 pm
Team(s) Supported: England
Kent

Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Sun Aug 06, 2017 12:35 pm

On this day in 1947 wickets tumble on day one of Derbyshire against Essex.

The day started badly for Derbyshire when they were four down before lunch. It was only after lunch that opener Arthur Townsend managed to form any type of partnership. He first put on 24 alongside Albert Alderman and then 26 with Eric Marsh before he himself went on 86 when Derbyshire were 162-7. A last ditch partnership of 56 from tenth wicket pair Edward Gothard and Cliff Gladwin saw Derbyshire get to 223 all out. Trevor Bailey was Essex's biggest wicket taker with figures of 5-83.

Essex's opening salvo followed a similar patterns to Derbyshire's. Dickie Dodds and Chick Cray put on 30 together before both fell for the gain of no run. From there wickets fell regularly. Frank Vigar, batting at number 5, was the only mainstay as those around him fell. He began to hog the strike as is shown by the fact that the four batsmen either side of him were out in single figures whereas he finished the day on 57*. He was joined by Doug Insole who was on 4. Bill Copson and George Pope had two wickets apiece. Essex were 130-7 and 93 runs behind Derbyshire.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
User avatar
The Professor
 
Posts: 2370
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 9:11 pm
Team(s) Supported: England
Kent

Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Mon Aug 07, 2017 12:46 am

Just seen that Doug Insole, a key player in today and tomorrow's posts, passed away yesterday.

Sad news.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
User avatar
The Professor
 
Posts: 2370
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 9:11 pm
Team(s) Supported: England
Kent

Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Mon Aug 07, 2017 10:24 am

On this day in 1947 the last man completely turns around Essex's innings against Derbyshire.

Essex's day began well when the overnight pair of Frank Vigar and Doug Insole continued on strongly. The pair added 65 to their overnight total before Doug Insole fell just shy of his half century, bowled by Bill Copson.

Vigar then formed another tentative partnership with Ray Smith. Both partners got 21 runs in a 42 run partnership. When Smith was sent back by George Pope, the score was 199-9 with only one batsmen left and a 24 run deficit to make up.

The last man in was Ray Smith's cousin, Peter. Peter had been known as a world class bowler in his career but had also, in his younger days, batted higher in the order. Now in his benefit year he was your archetypal number 11 and hopes would not have been high.

Over the course of the afternoon, he belied all expectation and scored 163 runs. He was ably supported by Vigar, who got himself a century in the process but where he had previously sheltered the tail he was now being overshadowed by Smith. Ludicrously the final wicket put on a total of 218 for the last wicket and swelled the total to 417 - an 194 run lead over Derbyshire.

This quickfire partnership had been so quickfire that it allowed Derbyshire to bat again before the end of the day. They lost two wickets cheaply but had a relatively set partnership of Charlie Elliot (40*) and David Smith (18*) to see them into day three.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
User avatar
The Professor
 
Posts: 2370
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 9:11 pm
Team(s) Supported: England
Kent

Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Tue Aug 08, 2017 10:44 am

On this day in 1947 Derbyshire join in with shocking last men feats but Essex take victory.

Charlie Elliott and David Smith stayed together for the first hour of the day's play before the latter was gone for 35, bowled by Ray Smith. Again, the middle order disappointed for Derbyshire but a late order resurgence saw them overhaul the Essex total. Edward Gothard and Cliff Gladwin, who put together a strong partnership on Day One, performed admirably again. Gothard was out first on 40, another victim of Ray Smith.

Whether Bill Copson was inspired by the feats of Peter Smith the day before is hard to say but he batted the innings of his life. He ended his career with an average of 6.81 but that was dragged up by the 38* that he produced in this innings. Gladwin also managed to get himself his half century before being dismissed off the bowling of Trevor Bailey on 52. Derbyshire were all out for 304. Bailey and Ray Smith shared the wickets.

Essex were set 111 to win. Due to his heroics the previous day, Peter Smith was moved up the order. He was brought to the crease at first drop after the loss of Chick Cray on 32-1. He got just 4 runs. From there it was Harry Crabtree and Frank Vigar who did the majority of the heavy lifting. Crabtree was dismissed by Gladwin on 30 with 8 runs left but Vigar and *modded* Horsfall got Essex over the line.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
User avatar
The Professor
 
Posts: 2370
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 9:11 pm
Team(s) Supported: England
Kent

Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Wed Aug 09, 2017 7:33 am

On this day in 1796 a wildly popular game between injured Chelsea Pensioners caused mayhem.

The match pitched those with one leg against those with one arm and was to start at 9AM in Montpelier Gardens, Walworth and all started without hitch.

The one-legged team batted first and got a total of 93 runs. The one-armed team began their chase when a huge disturbance stopped the game.

Unbeknownst to the players, there was such a clamour of spectators to view the game that it was causing a huge crush to enter the ground. This caused a number of people to break down the gates so as to get in and not incur any fatalities. Whilst nobody died there were a number of injuries amongst the spectators.

The game did not continue for three hours but when it did, the one-armed men were all out for 60. The one-legged men were 60-6 in reply when the Light failed them.

Games such as this were quite common in the era and would often go to the one-legged team.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
User avatar
The Professor
 
Posts: 2370
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 9:11 pm
Team(s) Supported: England
Kent

Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Thu Aug 10, 2017 11:11 am

On this day in 2008 Dundee University played their first 40 over game against Crathie.

Crathie won the toss and put Dundee in on a slow pitch that had been effected by rain. Opener Colin Reid and number four Varun Gopalakrishnan made slow and steady progress and by the halfway mark Dundee were 56-3.

The run rate was upped considerably when Dennis Petrie and Steve Boarder put on 49 in 6 overs with the tail wagging also as Miles Dixon, batting at 8, and Scott Rodgers, batting at 9, got 12 and 31 respectively. Dundee were 191-7 at the end of their innings.

There were early wickets for Crathie in reply and they were soon 10-3. Opener Humphrey and Rhod McEwan put on a healthy 23 together before they were separated. Single Figure scores ensued. Bob McAra, who looked good initially, was soon sent packing for just 4 after a spectacular catch by Mark Stephenson. Eventually Crathie were all out for 97, handing Dundee University a 94 run win.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
User avatar
The Professor
 
Posts: 2370
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 9:11 pm
Team(s) Supported: England
Kent

Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Fri Aug 11, 2017 11:03 am

On this day in 2001 Twyford outplay Binfield

In scenes reminiscent of such fixtures up and down the country, Twyford could only field a team of nine and so were already up against it as they faced third placed Binfield.

Twyford made Binfield rue the decision to put them in first as opener Matt Connor carried his bat for a score of 82*. Richard Hobson offered him ample support in a partnership of 59 before he was out to a poor shot on 31. Tom Hall then upped the run rate won his debut for Twyford with some good stroke play, before being dismissed just before his half century. The tail played its part with Tom Jackson (30) and Neil Downes (24) taking the total to 231.

Twyford got their first wicket in the first over with Jackson sending back their opener. This brought on Binfield's best player Mark Firth. Despite Firth's decent cricketing shots, Jackson kept removing his partners until the score was 70-4. When Hobson was introduced to bowl he took Firth and Jackson ran through the tail. He ended up with six wickets and the team's victory to show from his day's work.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
User avatar
The Professor
 
Posts: 2370
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 9:11 pm
Team(s) Supported: England
Kent

Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Sat Aug 12, 2017 10:50 am

On this day in 1972 rain is the winner on Day One of Sussex v Surrey.

Only 13 overs of play were able to be bowled on the first day in Eastbourne but in that time the openers went big. The day ended with Michael Edwards on 20 and Roy Lewis on 18 leaving Surrey on 38-0 overnight.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
User avatar
The Professor
 
Posts: 2370
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 9:11 pm
Team(s) Supported: England
Kent

Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Sun Aug 13, 2017 11:38 am

On this day in 1972 Surrey and Sussex make up for lost time with runs aplenty.

The opening partnership of Michael Edwards and Roy Lewis continued to stretch itself out into the second day. It wasn't until the pair had put on 130 together until Lewis was dislodged by Michael Buss. Buss returned for his partner in short order and Surrey were 167-2.

Surrey then played combatively with declaration on their mind. Younis Ahmed was out for 26 before Graham Roope and Micky Stewart started putting on runs steadily. They had amassed 68 when their captain called them in with Surrey on a round 300.

In reply Sussex lost Geoffrey Greenidge cheaply but Peter Graves and Roger Prideaux put on 68. When Pat Pocock removed Graves on 35 he was soon returning for Buss and Sussex were 104-3. There were just six more runs in the day's play with Prideaux and, new batsman, Jim Parks to continue the next day.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
User avatar
The Professor
 
Posts: 2370
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 9:11 pm
Team(s) Supported: England
Kent

Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Mon Aug 14, 2017 11:09 am

On this day in 1972 there was a rest day for Surrey and Sussex so we will look at Pat Pocock, a figure who plays a big part on the final day of the game.

Pocock was right in the middle of his spell as one of the best Cricketers in the land yet was being blithely ignored by England.

He made his debut in 1967 in place of Fred Titmuss who had lost some of his toes in a boating accident.

Pocock' affiliation with the England selectors was somewhat confusing. He was dropped after he got his highest career score of 6-79 against Australia. His next match in an England jersey was not until 4 years after this match.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
User avatar
The Professor
 
Posts: 2370
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 9:11 pm
Team(s) Supported: England
Kent

Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Tue Aug 15, 2017 11:03 am

On this day in 1972 two declarations and a killer final two overs make the Sussex-Surrey game one to remember.

Resuming on 104-3, Roger Prideaux continued on throughout the morning session. He batted alongside Jim Parks before he was dismissed for 29 by Intikhab Alam. Intikhab returned next ball and dismissed John Spencer. Prideaux then hooked up with Jeremy Morley and the pair were putting on good runs. After Prideaux got his century the captain called Sussex in on 226-5, still 74 runs behind, in order to force a result.

Surrey were singing from the same hymn sheet as Sussex. They went out and played some quick cricket. Opener Michael Edwards failed in this endeavour with 8 but some decent scores in the high twenties and early thirties by the top order propelled Surrey to 130-5 when a particularly sporting declaration left Sussex needing 205 in twenty overs; a familiar equation for modern cricket fans.

Peter Graves was gone for just 14, caught off the bowling of Robin Jackman, but Geoffrey Greenidge and Prideaux were trotting along comfortably enough on 68 and 91 respectively and their team on 187-1. The equation was down to 18 runs from three overs.

Pocock came on in the eighteenth over. His first ball sent Greenidge back to the pavilion. His third ball did the same for his replacement, Michael Buss. His replacement, Jim Parks, got Sussex's first runs of the over off Pocock's fourth delivery however Pocock had his revenge with his dismissal off the last ball. Sussex were 189-4 and needed 16 runs from two overs.

Jackman bowled the penultimate over. The pair of Prideaux and Mike Griffith got 5 and 4 respectively and were 200-4, five runs from victory, when Pocock took the ball for the final over. Off the first ball Prideaux was caught by Roy Lewis on 97. Griffith faced up to Pocock's hat trick ball....and was walking back with the catch yet again going to Lewis. The score was 200-6, five runs off four balls.

The next ball Jeremy Morley tried to grasp the bull by the horns...and got gouged. Pocock had four wickets in four balls and six in nine. Spencer took a single off the fourth ball but the fifth saw the end of Tony Buss. With one ball remaining the score was 201-8.

The last ball was bowled to Uday Joshi, which meant that the last seven balls that Pocock threw down were all to different batsmen. Joshi tried to sneak two runs (understandably) and was run out. The score was 202-9 - a draw.

Pocock's last two overs read 2-0-4-7.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
User avatar
The Professor
 
Posts: 2370
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 9:11 pm
Team(s) Supported: England
Kent

Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Wed Aug 16, 2017 10:53 am

On this day in 1841 a game of handicapped Chelsea Pensioners against Greenwich Pensioners began.

As all such matches of this ilk, this game proved very popular with 2000 people pouring to Camberwell for this game. Sixteen years had elapsed since the last game of such kind but the popularity remained unabated; despite the fact the reports being mostly on 'the various falls that occurred'.

In relative terms the Greenwich Pensioners were considerably younger than their compatriots from Chelsea and seemed to have the run on the, from the off. The Chelsea Pensioners were dismissed for a miserly 19 runs. By the time play had closed for the day Greenwich had amassed 98.

With the game to continue the next day, they sat together for their evening meal of lamb and roast and boiled beef.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
User avatar
The Professor
 
Posts: 2370
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 9:11 pm
Team(s) Supported: England
Kent

PreviousNext

Return to Cricketing Blogs

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest