On This Day

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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Thu Aug 17, 2017 10:35 am

On this day in 1841 the Greenwich Pensioners soundly beat their Chelsea counterparts.

Having already surpassed the Chelsea total of 19 rather considerably, Greenwich went on to score another 78 runs in their innings to take their total to 176 - a 157 run win.

At the end of the game the players collected in the middle, drunk to the Queen and received ten shillings.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Fri Aug 18, 2017 10:49 pm

On this day in 1965 Leicestershire put on a good total on the first day of their three day game against Nottinghamshire.

The top three batsmen were the ones that did the most damage for Leicestershire. The openers of Maurice Hallam and Brian Booth put on 54 together before the latter fell for 20. Hallam then joined forces with Peter Marner. Together they added 59. After his two half century partnerships, Hallam was dismissed for 54 off the bowling of Ian Davison.

Marne then struggled to find partners. David Constant stayed semi-true to his name by adding 45 to the effort but the middle and lower order struggled with a slew of single Figure scores. Marner did manage to get out for 109 before the end of the innings. With just one batsman left in the hutch, captain Hallam fancied a go at the Nottinghamshire batsmen in the final overs, so declared on 288-8.

Leicestershire did get one wicket, that of Norman Hill but Brian Bolus and Barrie Whittingham kept the home fires burning and saw Nottinghamshire to 33-1 at stumps.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Sat Aug 19, 2017 10:44 am

On this day in 1965 Nottinghamshire fight back on Day Two v Leicestershire.

Whilst Leicestershire's Day One total was padded through a century stand from Peter Marner, it was Barrie Whittingham who did the leg work for Nottinghamshire. He put on another 62 with overnight partner Brian Bolus before he was sent back on 39.

Ian Moore was then dismissed cheaply before another substantial partnership was formed between Whittingham and Mike Smedley. Whittingham edged towards his century and Smedley got his half century when he was dismissed on 58 by Marner. The score was 249-4.

Whether the word went out to speed up the run scoring or whether wickets fell freely, the next few overs saw a procession of Nottinghamshire batsmen come and go. In amongst this Whittingham was dismissed for 126.

With the score on 289-9 - a one run lead over the Leicestershire total - Geoff Millman called his batsmen back in. With a day and half a session left the game was equal.

Within that half session Nottinghamshire removed both Leicestershire's openers. Brian Booth gone for just 6 and Maurice Hallam a more combative 22. Marner and Stanley Jayasinghe then held strong to see their County to 78-2 at stumps; 77 runs ahead of Nottinghamshire going in to the final day.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Sun Aug 20, 2017 10:50 am

On this day in 1965 Clive Inman breaks records on the final day of Nottinghamshire against Leicestershire.

Quick run scoring was the order of the day for both teams. Overnight batsman Stanley Jayasinghe answered this call and, alongside Peter Marner, piled on the runs in the opening session. In response to this, Geoff Millman, the desperate Nottinghamshire captain, took desperate measures. He began to employ his batsmen as bowlers in order to force his opposite number, Marner, in to declaring. Instead he and his Sri Lankan counterpart seized on whatever they could and bobbed and weaved the bad balls.

If Nottinghamshire thought their job was done when opening batsmen Brian Bolus bowled Jayasinghe for 99 they had another thing coming. In the space of two overs his replacement, Clive Inman, scored ten boundaries with 5 fours and 5 sixes. It took the Sri Lankan eight minutes to reach his half century. Inman got to 57 by the time Marner, not out on 71, called it a day with the score on 258-3.

Nottinghamshire needed 259 in two and a half hours. Norman Hill, the unfortunate recipient of the pasting from Inman earlier, was out for just 6 but Bolus and Barrie Whittingham again impressed with a partnership of 84. They were both dismissed just shy of their half centuries by Jack van Geloven. Mike Smedley got to his half century as time waned and hands were shaken with Nottinghamshire on 166-3.

There was something of an outcry regarding Inman's innings. Cricket purists regarded his quickfire half century an insult to the game and the umpire was asked to provide a report to the MCC.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:26 am

On this day in 1856 William Lillywhite died.

Lillywhite was born in 1792 in Chichester and would go on to play for a number of teams in his celebrated cricketing career.

He made his debut for Sussex in 1825. His successes were hampered due to the fact that cricket was still in it's formative stages at this time and games were sporadic.

The mid-1830s was Lillywhite's heyday. He took over 50 wickets for the first time in 1836 and probably had his best overall season in 1837.

By the early 1840s, Lillywhite was bolstering the amount of cricket he was playing by turning out for Sussex, Hampshire, Middlesex and the MCC.

His biggest contribution to cricket was the fact that many claim him to be the father of roundarm bowling. He took part in the series of games that acted as a way for the MCC to evaluate the effectiveness of the action (viewtopic.php?f=30&t=20694&p=722536&hilit=Lillywhite#p722536)

Lillywhite was killed by, what would become known as, the Broad Street cholera epidemic. He lived in Islington, just 4 miles from the centre of the epidemic.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Tue Aug 22, 2017 10:47 am

On this day in 1930 Australia claim the Ashes with huge fifth Test win over England.

England began the morning on 25-1, looking down the barrel of a huge deficit of 264 to even have to ask Australia to bat again.

Having lost Jack Hobbs late last night, England began poorly by losing Dodger Whysall for just ten in the opening overs.

Herbert Sutcliffe and Duleep then put on a steadying partnership of 81 to take England to 118-3 before the former was displaced for 54, the first wicket of Percy Hornibrook. The Queensland born bowler then ran through the middle order. Maurice Leyland and Wally Hammond put up a bit of a fight for scores of 60 and 29 - but their partnership only overlapped by 18 runs and England could not sustain any momentum.

Batsmen five onwards all fell victim to Hornibrook and were out for scores in the single figures with the exception of George Duckworth's 15. England could only muster 251 all out and handed Australia an innings and 39 run victory as well as the urn.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Wed Aug 23, 2017 9:33 am

On this day in 1849 the second match of the Canterbury Cricket Week takes place between the Gentlemen of Kent and England.

Many high class spectators flooded to Canterbury to take in this marquis fixture and saw England win the toss and bat.

The openers, Edward Grimston and Esrom, were immediately put under the cosh by the Kent bowlers. Grimston, who had been in bad form for some time, was out for just five. He was replaced by John Lee who barely got himself settled before he was caught by Nicholas Felix off the bowling of James Dyer. Charles Harenc got his first wicket of the day through removing Esrom for 13.

The English tide seemed to be turning when William Nicholson came out and began to score quickly but was out just as quickly for 6 bowled by Harenc. In the selfsame over Edward Hartopp was gone lbw for a duck. The score was now 37-5.

Harry Fellowes was removed for just one, which then brought together Jones Nash and Robert Keate. This pair belied what had gone before and put on a healthy stand together. Nash had put on 16 before Felix displaced him. Keate then found a willing partner in Whitehead. This partnership, along with the one that went before, frustrated Kent. They brought on Arthur Mynn who managed to displace Whitehead on 8. The score was now 80-8.

Keate was the next to fall, bowled by Harenc on 18. England were 88-9. A single run was added before Frederick Bathurst was the last man out.

Traill and Norton opened the batting for Kent. Nash got the first Kentish scalp, bowling a slower ball to do for Traill for just five. James Dyer then joined Norton but managed just two runs when he was caught by Esrom off the bowling of Bathurst. Mynn came in and was beaten by another one of Nash's slower balls and Kent were suddenly 12-3.

Felix then put on something of a stand with Norton. The pair scored around the ground and, as their confidence grew, they got more aggressive. England swapped their bowlers around but to no avail. The pair had put on 47 when Norton was run out on 20.

Normal service then resumed for Kent. Harenc was caught by Fellowes off the bowling of Nash for 0. Burnett then joined the free-hitting Felix and they began to play well. By the time Burnett was bowled by Bathurst the score was 120-6.

Henry Andrews came and went for the addition of no runs, being bowled by Fellowes. After this Felix's innings came to an end after he skied a delivery from Bathurst into the hands of Nash. He had made 70. This was the last ball of the day.

With two wickets left to go, stumps were drawn on Day One. The second day would begin with both Bosworth and George Dickens on nought. With 121 runs on the board, Kent had a lead of 32.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Thu Aug 24, 2017 8:34 am

On this day in 1849 England seize the honours against Kent.

Kent only managed a solitary run over and above their overnight score. This gave them a 34 run lead over England.

England once more took to the crease and were, once more, singularly unimpressive. William Nicholson lived up to his early promise of yesterday by getting 20 runs after the two English openers were out for a joint total of 5. He then became the second wicket for Traill. He shared a small partnership with Harry Fellowes who then struck off on his own for another score of 20 before becoming over ambitious and getting run out. A late salvo from Whitehead worth 54 runs bolstered the score but coming, as it did, in amongst 7 of the batsmen getting single figure score, the total was a disappointing 145. England were now just 111 runs ahead of Kent. Charles Harenc claimed four of the English wickets.

Kent would have felt confident but pride comes before a fall and Kent batted abysmally with Henry Andrews' 35 and George Dickens' 23 being the only scores in double figures. Harry Fellowes claimed four wickets and a catch as Kent whimpered to just 95 runs which included 10 byes and 4 wides.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Fri Aug 25, 2017 11:03 am

On this day in 2001 relegation threatened Twyford beat Stratfield Turgis.

Stratfield won the toss and elected to bat.

After five overs the score was 21-2 with both openers being removed by Tom Jackson. Stratfield then had Stephen Clarke and Danny Spence together who put on a good 55 partnership. With Spence on 16 he was removed by the returning Jackson.

Shortly after Clarke injured himself and a runner was called for. After this his run scoring became more hit and miss and eventually he was caught behind on 52.

The middle order held up well. Matthew Sandland was the chief tormentor with 34 but wickets were coming too regularly for Twyford. The last salvo came from Sean Spence who managed a strong 28. Stratfield closed their innings on 169 from the 45 overs allowed.

In reply Twyford lost Nic Downes cheaply but Matt Connor played well throughout his innings for a score of 52. He was joined by Richard Hobson with whom he put on 90 for the second wicket but fell to a soft dismissal just short of his half century.

With the score on 106-3, Joe Downes came to the wicket and played a swashbuckling cameo of 20. Jackson was next to the wicket and played a defensive hand for his score of 23*. All throughout this Connor was an ever present acting as the foil to the other batsmen.

With one game left in the season relegation was in Twyford's hands.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Sat Aug 26, 2017 9:42 am

On this day in 1909 a game between Middlesex and Gloucestershire was played out in a day.

Middlesex, led by Frank Tarrant, went in first. He was the main man for Middlesex. As all those around him fell away he carried his bat. The team total of 55 was what let him down.

As well as carrying his bat in the first innings, he bowled, without change, through both Gloucestershire innings. He claimed 13 wickets.

These two teams seemed to have a curious affinity with the one day match in the first decade of the 1900s. Earlier in the season Gloucestershire played out a One Day game with Nottinghamshire whilst the following season Middlesex also had a shortened game against Notts.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Sun Aug 27, 2017 10:08 am

On this day in 1914 Yorkshire have the upper hand on Day One of their game against Somerset.

Whilst the rest of the country were somewhat preoccupied with other things, Yorkshire were showing complete and utter dominance in the County Championship. They arrived in Weston-Super-Mare with very high expectations - and ones that were met in the first day.

Yorkshire batted first and reached an underwhelming 132 - hampered by a newly laid pitch badly effected by rain. The only batsmen to have shown any fighting spirit were David Denton (52) and Alonzo Drake (51).

It was a good day for Drake as he also had his say with the ball. Having been able to do some first hand research in the first two sessions, he spent the last session accumulating 5 wickets. The other five coming from Major Booth (a suitably military Christian name). Due to the war effort hampering their bowling attack, Booth and Drake had been, largely, used to bowling unchanged throughout whole matches. This was the third successive innings they had done so. Somerset were all out by the end of the day for just 44 - with Ernie Robson's 19 the only score in double figures.

Yorkshire had a lead of 87.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Mon Aug 28, 2017 9:58 am

On this day in 1914 Alonzo Drake claims all ten wickets as Yorkshire trounce Somerset.

Yorkshire opened the batting in the morning with a lead of 87 runs. They began as poorly as Somerset finished. Their first four batsmen were all out for single figures off the bowling of Jimmy Bridges. It was Wilfred Rhodes' combative 25 that bolstered the total. The only other scores of note was last man, Edgar Oldroyd who got 23 and Alonzo Drake's 12. To get to 112 seemed a miracle on the incredibly bowling friendly pitch. Bridges ended with figures of 4-54 whilst Ernie Robson blew away the lower order for figures of 5-38. Yorkshire's lead was 199.

Bert Bisgood and Len Braund started brightly with scores of 11 and 9 respectively but from there it was largely a single figure affair. A ninth wicket partnership of 37 formed by Philip Hope and John Harcombe, was the only substantive contribution leading Somerset to being all out for 90. Every Somerset batsman was removed by Drake who finished with figures of 8.5-0-35-10. He, yet again, bowled unchanged with Major Booth - their fourth successive innings doing so.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Tue Aug 29, 2017 7:37 am

On this day in 1791 a grand cricket match began between Nottingham and the Mary-le-bone Club.

The game was to be played for the lofty prize of one thousand guineas and it is believed ten thousand spectators witnessed the event over the two days.

The first day's play perfectly spanned the Mary-le-bone innings. George Hatton, the 10th Earl of Winchelsea and Lieutenant Colonel Charles Lenox, the 4th Duke of Richmond, started well before William Chapman set about gutting the top order. He got the Lieutenant Colonel out and followed it up with an MP to claim three of the top 5 batsmen. By the time the fifth wicket fell Mary-le-bone had put on 32 runs.

Charles Anguish and Sir John Lister Kaye then put together a strong sixth wicket stand before Kaye was run out on 18. The tail refused to wag but Anguish helped them through and ended on 47 not out with Mary-le-bone totalling 126. Chapman ended up with a fivefer.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Wed Aug 30, 2017 6:32 am

On this day in 1791 Nottingham capitulate to an innings loss against Mary-le-bone.

After posting 126 yesterday, Mary-le-bone showed their acumen with the ball. They had the first three batsmen out for the gain of just one run...and things didn't get much better from there.

Samuel Hedderley tried to strike up a partnership with a Nottingham batsman but none were forthcoming. He was eventually out to the Earl of Winchelsea for 19 - Nottingham's top score. Last man, James Stephenson put up a valiant 12 but Nottingham got 63 and were asked to bat again.

This time the opener, William Barker, put on a good start of 12 runs but was not offered any support. Knock Nottingham any way you want but they were consistent. Edward Stephenson got four in both innings, Joseph Gilbert got a pair and even Stephenson matched his heroics with another 12. Nottingham fell one run short of asking Mary-le-bone to bat again but were out on 62 and handed them an innings and one run victory.

The Earl of Winchelsea was the best of the bowlers. He got five wickets in Nottingham's first innings but only one in the second.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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Re: On This Day

Postby The Professor » Thu Aug 31, 2017 7:00 am

On this day in 2015 England beat Australia in a big scoring T20 game.

Moeen Ali and Eoin Morgan's valiant partnership counterbalanced an abysmal start in Cardiff. Both Jason Roy and Alex Hales were out for a combined 14 runs before the third wicket partnership came to the crease. Both players got into the seventies, with Roy taking the scenic route to his 70 ball 72*. Morgan took the faster path and scorched 74 off 50 balls before falling victim to the fast bowling of Nathan Coulter-Nile. Jos Buttler pushed England over the line with a five ball 11. England ended up on 182-5.

Australia had an equally poor start with 12 runs coming from their two openers. Again it was the third wicket partnership, this time between Steve Smith (90) and Glenn Maxwell (40), that dragged Australia up. When they fell, to David Willey and Ali respectively, their tail performed less well and, in a panic, both Matthew Wade (2) and Pat Cummins (0) got run out. Australia could only get to 177-8 in reply and handing England a 5 run lead.
"It has been said of the unseen army of the dead, on their everlasting march, that when they are passing a rural cricket ground the Englishman falls out of the ranks for a moment to look over the gate and smile."
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